RHT Around The World

Canada

The folk behind the green masks in Canada come from international development and green organisations along with trade unions and environmental agencies. Their key message is that the Canadian government should commit to a Financial Transaction Tax and use the money to help the poorest at home and abroad, and tackle climate change. The Canadian government has been a big blocker on taxes on the banks. But thanks to strong campaigning the good news is that things are progressing. The opposition New Democratic Party has also announced public support for an FTT and the Bloc Quebecoise is generally supportive. So let’s hope the campaign keeps making headway in softening up the Government opposition to an FTT.

Ireland

As the finishing touches are put on the world’s first regional Robin Hood Tax/Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) across most of Europe’s major economies, there’s one small country that would have plenty of reasons to get on board: Ireland. With that in mind we’re excited to announce that Robin Hood Tax Ireland has arrived! And it’s needed now more than ever. The Irish banks have so far managed to avoid footing the bill for a crisis they helped cause. And as one of the European countries hardest hit by the banking crash, it’s been the Irish people who’ve paid the highest price.

Spain

The Spanish campaign has been working hard to spread the word of a Robin Hood Tax. The campaign want to use the money raised by a tax on the banks to help Spain keep its commitment to international aid. They believe that those responsible for the crisis should pay their fair share and help protect the poorest from the effects of the crisis. The Spanish President has spoken favourably about an FTT and linking any money raised to international development. However, the Ministry of Finance is completely opposed to any kind of taxes on the banks as they already have strong regulation in place. But if the campaign can get celebs in tights, they can take on the Sheriff of Nottingham.

The Netherlands

The Dutch Robin Hood Tax campaign launched in September 2011, and is led by Oxfam Novib.  The Dutch campaign believes that in these times of crisis everyone should pay their fair share, including the banks and big financial institutions. The revenue raised by a Robin Hood Tax should help poor people both at home and abroad. Unfortunately the current Government is hesitant to support the tax, so the Dutch campaign is going to make some serious noise to convince politicians to get behind this brilliant idea.

United Kingdom

Home to Robin’s Sherwood Forest, the UK was the first country to launch a Robin Hood Tax campaign in February 2010. Since then it has grown to number almost a quarter of a million supporters and 117 organisations, including domestic charities, green groups, trade unions and international development organisations.   The financial crisis and recession have left a massive hole in the UK’s public finances. The campaign believes that the financial sector should pay their fair share to clean up the mess they helped create, and help those worst affected both at home and abroad.   The UK government does not yet support a Robin Hood Tax, but with support growing in Europe for a Financial Transaction Tax, the pressure is mounting. It’s up to the Merry Men and Women of Britain to don some tights and make sure the campaign stays on the political agenda.

United States

The States may not have a formal campaign but it does have a lot of merry folk working for taxes on the financial sector. They come from unions, think tanks and groups that focus on the environment, international health, consumer protection and financial reform. The message is simple – it’s time for Wall Street to give back to Main Street. After the bank bailout, the government now needs a lot of money to deal with a huge budget deficit and to help meet the USA’s commitments on aid and climate finance. And the banks can afford to help out After the midterm election, supportive groups are now focusing on getting their message about a tax on the banks across all corners of the country from the public and the media right up to Congress and the White House administration.

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